A LITTLE MORE ABOUT CHIMNEYS
The key use of a chimney is to safely remove the elements of combustion  from a fireplace to t...

A LITTLE MORE ABOUT CHIMNEYS

The key use of a chimney is to safely remove the elements of combustion  from a fireplace to the outside atmosphere, without causing any danger to  the occupants of the building.
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Hot air rises from high pressure to low pressure,  and gases move from the fire upwards out into the atmosphere, which is the fundamental  way chimneys operate. This method of design has remained unchanged since the invention of chimneys.
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The History of Chimneys:
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The Romans used tubes inside internal walls to draw smoke out of their bakeries. However, it was the 12th century that chimneys are thought to have appeared, usually in very large building and grand homes. It was 1185 when the earliest recorded chimney in the UK was thought to have existed. It was then not until 16th and 17th century that chimneys became common place in homes across the land – some 1,700 years since the Roman empire was founded! Industrial chimneys became common place in the 18th century.
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Chimneys in normal homes and buildings were originally built of wood and plaster or even mud, but later from brick or stone. To control any downdrafts, chimney pots were designed. These have become an iconic look of many roof tops depicting days gone by.
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Chimney Terminology:
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Most people know very little about the elements of a chimney, and the associated terminology. Most are aware there is a tall structure, which allows smoke to escape but that’s about it. There are a few more things to a chimney such as:
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A Flue – This is a duct or a pipe which smoke and products of combustion are removed from the fire to the outside atmosphere. The term flue in the past actually meant chimney.
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A Flue pipe – This is a metal appliance used to connect an appliance to the flue in a chimney.
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Chimney – This is the actual structure surrounding one or more flues. A chimney is usually the only visual element someone would see as the rest is hidden from sight.
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Chimney terminal – This is the pot (chimney pot) which is found at the top of the chimney.
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The European Standard BS EN 1443: 2003 Chimneys – General Requirements, categorises chimneys and flues into three basic designations:
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Custom Built Chimneys – Built on site using factory made flue liners.
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System Chimneys – Prefabricated chimney systems. Made in a factory and put together on site. The main advantages of chimney systems is in their off-site production and preformed insulation.
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Connecting Flue Pipes – Specifically designed to connect an appliance to the flue or chimney.
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Why Do We Line Chimneys?
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Chimneys that are not lined, or systems that were constructed before 1965 may need a modern lining for a range of reasons. The original flue may have deteriorated and could be leaking smoke into rooms or other parts of the building. Sometimes tar can seep through the walls of the chimney and cause staining on the walls in the building.  A system, which is defective and well past it’s best can contribute to a poor updraft. An updraft is where hot air rises. Any form of debris or friction in the chimney can cause a poor updraft, and as a result a poor flow of gases.
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Chimney Renovation
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Renovating a chimney is a specialist job. The procedure of renovation can be achieved in a number of ways. Insulating concrete can be pumped in and around an inflatable former – allowing for a chimney funnel to be newly created. A stainless steel flexible liner can also be lowered down, or a spray-on coating or ceramic coating can be used as an alternative. Prices for renovating a chimney can vary depending on a wide range of factors, including the size, the condition of the chimney, and of course the renovation technique you wish to opt for.
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Chimney & Building Regulations
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Currently there is no regulation requiring how an existing chimney should be lined. However, it should be done by a Competent Person, or approved by your local area Building Control if it’s being done in conjunction with the installation of a heating appliance.
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Chimney Faults
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If you are having your chimney swept by chimney sweep, they should inspect the chimney for a range of faults and issues, some of which include:
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1. Protruding cement at the joints
2. Masonry damaging the liner
3. Blocked terminal
4. Liners fitted upside down
5. Damage through incorrect sweeping
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Charlton and Jenrick manufacture and sell a wide range of gas fires and wood burning stoves. To locate a showroom near you, please use our showroom search facility here.

 

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